No signup sex hook up

Her story appeared in the college’s student newspaper. American culture seemingly has been divesting its stock in virginity since the sexual revolution more than half a century ago, but somehow the idea lingers. To say that something is a social construct is not to say it is trivial or meaningless.

Recently a young woman at Dartmouth College, having had sex for the first time with a man, reflected that she had “lost her virginity.” Then she put that thought on hold: “Virginity is just a total social construct,” she told her interviewer. Virginity is a social construct to the extent that we invest the state of virginity with social significance.

Of course, the kids in college who are hooking up aren’t thinking about mating at all, let alone creating enclave social systems.

They enjoy a different kind of enclave made possible by individual prosperity and institutional wealth, which have always provided a limited exemption from the rules that govern society as a whole.

The hook-up culture is the patrician version of inner-city promiscuity—without the immediate and dire consequences.

At its most basic, kinship is the way human societies organize the realities of sexual reproduction.

I’m not going to improve on that answer in the next few pages, but I’ll complicate it a bit.

The answer lies somewhere in the way we integrate the biological imperatives with the emotional and experiential realities.

Sex and human reproduction liberated from fairly stable pair-bonding wasn’t a viable possibility for most of human prehistory, and in the ethnographic and historical record, there is the barest trace of societies that did without pair-bonded marriage between men and women and stable families of some sort.

There are exceptional cases, most famously the Nayar and the Na.

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